Tips For Putting In Your Contact Lenses

Close-up photograph of young woman putting contact lens in eye

Putting in your contacts is a task that gets quicker and easier over time. However, that doesn't mean that any of the proper steps should be abandoned to make it go faster. Here are some crucial things to remember when it comes to caring for your contacts and your eyes. 

Wash Your Hands

Washing your hands is the obvious first step to putting in contacts, but it shouldn't be rushed. Take the time to use soap to get rid of bacteria and grime, and thoroughly rinse your hands afterward. Then, be sure to dry them. Leaving tap water on your hands can dilute the contact solution.  When you've dried your hands, make sure they don't have a lot of lint left clinging to them. Dirty hands can do more than contaminate your contacts. They can cause eye infections and even blindness.

Take Your Time

Rushing through the insertion process can cause eye injuries. Look at each contact lens before you put it in, checking it for any debris or tears. When the contact is on the tip of your index finger, it should curve upward like a cup. If it curves downward on the edges, it is likely inside out and will hurt when you put it in your eye. Take the time to place each contact in the right position on each eye. Position any other fingers so that they hold your eyelids open wider. This will give you the space you need to insert the lens directly onto the eye. Let your eyelids go and blink a few times to allow the lenses to settle in the right place.

Take Care of Your Case

Along with checking your hands and the contact themselves for any dirt or debris, it's also essential to check your contact case each day. If the eyewear storage is dirty, it won't do its job of keeping the lenses clean. If there is any debris, rinse out the case with your contact solution and allow it to air dry. Using tap water on it can introduce chemicals that aren't ideal for the contacts or the eyes.

The proper care of your contacts is a significant part of your overall hygiene. When you take care of your contacts, you will avoid raising your risk for a host of eye conditions and infections. For more information, contact us with your questions.